camera match tutorial Archive

Camera match tutorial

Photomontage renderings, if done right, can be a lot more appealing and realistic than standard architectural renderings.
The reason why this happens is that a real environment with dust, dirt, scratches and imperfections, by definition looks better than a computer generated one.

Furthermore, creating the entire scene in 3d can prove to be very time consuming, and if you are working in the architectural visualization business you know that deadlines are usually very tight and you can not afford to lose more time working on the environment than on the building.

Having said this, let’s start with the tutorial. Usually photomontages are used for exterior renderings, but in order to keep this tutorial as simple as it can be, I have chosen an interior environment.

Taking the photo
The most important thing when taking a photo that you will later use for camera match is to take as many accurate measurements as possible (you will need at least 5 reference points). Take a look at the photo below (click on it to view a higher resolution image)

As you can see, the dimensions are noted on all 3 axis (horizontal, longitudinal and vertical).

The next step is to bring the photo into 3ds max. Click on “views”, “viewport background”, or just click “alt+b” (shortcut for 3ds max 9).
Under background source, chose the image you need and select “match bitmap” under aspect ratio.

Tick “display background” and select “active only” (with the perspective viewport active).
Click the image to view a higher resolution one

Now it’s time to model some basic geometry that we will later match with the photo.
Make sure that under “units setup” in the preferences drop down menu the units are set to the same ones noted when you made the measurements (in this case, centimeters).

You don’t need to model anything fancy… just a set of planes with the same dimensions as some elements in your scene. You need a 90.5×45 cm plane for the table top, a 20×20.2 plane for the vase and another plane placed at a distance of 4.6 centimeters behind the table top for the wall.

At this point it’s time to match the points of our geometry with the ones from the photo.
With the perspective viewport activated go to “create”, “helpers”, “camera match”, “cam point”. With the snap toggle on, start creating cam points at the corners of the table top plane, and at the top corners of the plane for the vase.
Click the image to view a higher resolution one

Go to the “utilities tab” and click “camera match”. You will see the list with all the cam points you have created in the previous step.

Select cam point 01, and click “assign position”. Now click the top left corner of the table top on the background image. By doing this you will tell the software that the cam point 01 needs to be placed at the position you have indicated.
Repeat this step for all the cam points.
Click the image to view a higher resolution one

After having done this, click on “create camera”. If everything has been done correctly, this step will automatically generate a camera that matches the view of the photo.
If you place a 3d model on the 90.5×45 plane in your scene, it will appear to be on the table top when rendered.
Click the image to view a higher resolution one

General camera match advices
As I said at the beginning of the tutorial, camera match can help you create a photorealistic rendering in a shorter amount of time. However, it has a downside too; unlike a standard 3d rendering, you can not change the angle later, so it is better to take several photos of the environment and explain to the client that he needs to decide upon a view and he can not change his mind later.

Taking dimensions for an exterior photomontage can proof to be more difficult than in the example shown in this tutorial. Therefore it is good idea to have objects with standard dimensions in your photos (like lighting posts, traffic signs, etc.)

Bellow are 2 examples of photomontage renderings that I have done using this techniques (click on the images to view high resolution renderings).